To The Letter Episode 2: Building a Relationship

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It’s here! After several technical difficulties, we’re so happy to release Episode 2 of the podcast: Building a Relationship. In this episode, we take a trip through 1942 to dive into the developing relationship between Joe Olexa and Agnes Van Der Weide.

To the Letter is a podcast brought to you in collaboration with University Libraries, Professor Len O’Kelly, and a few talented GVSU Communications students. Joe Olexa is voiced by student Logan Church. Special thanks to Archivist for Collection Management, Annie Benefiel, who makes a guest appearance to explain how we got these letters, what we’re doing to preserve them, and strategies to preserve your own family letters!

Letters featured in Episode 2 are available below:

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Letter to Agnes Van Der Weide, sent by Joe Olexa on May 8, 1942.

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Letter to Agnes Van Der Weide, sent by Joe Olexa on May 13, 1942.

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Letter to Agnes Van Der Weide, sent by Joe Olexa on May 16, 1942.

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Letter to Agnes Van Der Weide, sent by Joe Olexa on June 25, 1942.

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Letter to Agnes Van Der Weide, sent by Joe Olexa on July 11, 1942.

What do you think of the budding relationship between Joe and Agnes? Let us know! Send questions and comments to rupinskl@gvsu.edu. We can’t wait to hear from you!

To the Letter: Podcast Episode 1: An Introduction to the Letters

We’re so pleased to announce the launch of a new venture here at Special Collections and University Archives – a podcast! We’re trying something a little different, and we hope you will listen!

To the Letter is a podcast brought to you in collaboration with University Libraries, Professor Len O’Kelly, and a few talented GVSU Communications students. On this podcast, we bring correspondence from GVSU’s Special Collections alive. In each episode you will hear (in their own words!) letters written by the people who lived through history and the stories behind them.

Join us as we dive into the story of a young soldier’s relationships and experiences during World War II…

Letters featured in Episode 1 are available below:

 

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Letter to Agnes Van Der Weide, sent by Joe Olexa on July 25, 1941.

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Letter to Agnes Van Der Weide, sent by Joe Olexa on August 23, 1941. 

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Letter to Agnes Van Der Weide, sent by Joe Olexa on September 1, 1941

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Bonus! Joe’s note to the Postmaster, Dec. 5, 1943

Have you ever been to Whalom Park? Heard “Amen” as a name? Let us know! Send questions, comments, and feedback to rupinskl@gvsu.edu. We can’t wait to hear from you!

Class of 1967 50th Reunion

Welcome to Seidman House IceSculpture Exhibit2

On June 24th, Grand Valley State University welcomed back members of its first graduating class. Members of the Class of 1967 returned to campus over the weekend to celebrate the anniversary of their graduation 50  years ago.

The Class of 1967 took a chance on the “college in the cornfields.” The 138 students who made up the class (including “pioneer” members who enrolled in the very first year, rather than transferring in later) knew a very different campus from today’s. While the Great Lakes Plaza remains a central academic hub, the size and scope of campus has greatly expanded.

As part of the weekend’s festivities, Special Collections and University Archives toured groups of the alumni through Seidman House.

Archivist for Collection Management, Annie Benefiel, displayed notable items from our collections, while Archivist for Public Services and Community Engagement, Leigh Rupinski, showed them an exhibit of 1960s photographs and documents.

Alumni were particular interested in the changes to Seidman House itself. Back in 1967, Seidman House was the “Collegiate Center”. It served as a student union, complete with bookstore downstairs. Although the “pit” (where performers like Arlo Guthrie entertained student crowds) remains, its primary purpose now is as a quiet study space for students. Instead of a bookstore, the downstairs houses our climate-controlled stacks.

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In the evening, staff attended the “Hootenanny” (party), where we manned a table of 1960s memorabilia drawn from the Archives. Items included yearbooks, student handbooks, the 1967 Commencement program, and course catalogs. Alumni eagerly flipped through memory books to help us identify unnamed faces in our photograph records.

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We were thrilled to be a part of the Reunion festivities!

Innovations in Learning: College IV

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College IV logo

In September of 1973 Grand Valley State Colleges (as it was then known) opened College IV. College IV was so named because it was the fourth college in GVSC’s cluster concept, joining the College of Arts & Sciences, Thomas Jefferson College, and William James College. College IV sought to create a barrier-free approach to higher education. According to the 1973-1974 catalog, “College IV has thrown away the lecture platform and class schedule, freed the student and the professor from the drudgery of fact-passing, and engaged them both as partners in the learning process”.

In College IV, instruction was delivered via “auto-instructional learning modules”. These portable information packets all followed the same format. They included a clear objective, a detailed study guide, and a self-assessment test for students to check their readiness for the final test. Additional tapes or films could be checked out of the A-V Center to supplement the readings. Some modules were conducted as telecourses such as “The Art of Being Human”. Each module was designed to be completed at the student’s own pace in order to encourage full-time workers, parents, and retirees to enroll. To pass, students had to demonstrate mastery over the subject. Only a 90% or “A” grade allowed students to pass–anything less meant restudy and a new final exam.

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A student browses College IV module booklets

Since there was no traditional classroom setting in College IV’s design, faculty were expected to be available throughout the day to work with students and answer questions.

Although envisioned as a four-year liberal arts college, College IV had both degree-seeking and non-degree options to emphasize job preparation. The majors included options like biology, chemistry, economics, English language and literature, mathematics, and philosophy. Later on, additional choices such as tourism, real estate and insurance, and advertising and PR were added.

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Brochures for the courses of study in College IV
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Areas of study listed in a publicity brochure (after College IV’s name changed to Kirkhof College)

Aside from its innovative curricular model, College IV also sought to meet students where it was most convenient for them. Students interested in enrolling in College IV could register and pay tuition via the “Mobile Campus”. The mobile unit visited area business, factories, and shopping malls on a regular basis. After registering, students could select modules, receive counseling, and take tests at the Mobile Campus.

College IV’s home on campus was in AuSable Hall. There, students had a study space as well as a laboratory and learning and testing center. Impressed by College IV’s practicality and dedication to reaching non-traditional students, local inventor and businessman Russel H. Kirkhof donated $1 million to Grand Valley in 1978. College IV was renamed Kirkhof College in his honor.

The University Archives contains administrative records related to College IV as well as numerous samples of the learning modules.